Literature

Welcome
29.11.2005
Literature

Literature




EcoDesign oder nicht sein

Author
Hansjörg Griese, Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM)

Source
Harry Schubert, Elektronik 24/ 2004

Link
elektroniknet, 01.06.2005




Manual on Ecodesign. 7 Steps for Implementation

Source / Editor
IHOBE

Content
This Manual provides criteria, as well as simple tools, for the Basque industries to implement the environmental factor into their products designing. The manual establishes 7 steps for the implementation of Ecodesign methodology resulting in low environmental impact products and services. Available for free in Basque, Spanish, and English. Registration required.

Link
Manual on Ecodesign




Background Report for a UNEP Guide to LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT - A bridge to sustainable products

Authors / Editors
Allan Astrup Jensen and Arne Remmen

Source
UNEP

Link
Background Report for a UNEP Guide to LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT - A bridge to sustainable products




"Welcome to the Jungle" - Survival of the Fittest Environmental Screening Indicators?

Authors
Marcel Hagelüken, Karsten SchischkeFraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM)

Abstract
The implementation of Design for Environment in companies' R&D departments typically relies on benchmarking of different design options from the environmental (and economical) point of view. Hence, the
application of screening methods and indicators is the first choice in supporting decisions in electronics design. This paper brings light into the jungle of available indicators and explores which might be applicable for which focus. Several methods for eco-design support in the electronics industry are analyzed and compared. Within the different classes, many methods show certain similarities.

Source
Electronics Goes Green 2004+, Joint International Congress and Exhibition - Driving Forces for Future Electronics

Link
Proceedings Electronics Goes Green 2004+ Online Order Form




Design for Environment of Electrical and Electronic Automotive Components
Based on Life Cycle Assessment

Authors
Juan Carlos Alonso, Julio Rodrigo and Francesc Castells

Abstract
The Electrical and Electronic Division of Lear Corporation (LEED) is integrating environmental considerations into its product design and development processes with the final purpose of improving the environmental performance of its automotive products during their lifetime. This integration is based on the experience obtained in previous Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Design for Environment (DfE) case studies. In these studies, the environmental performance of some electrical and electronic products manufactured by Lear were analysed with the goal of identifying and quantifying the aspects with a major environmental load. To quantify these loads during the product life, the Life Cycle Assessment methodology was used. For those aspects that cannot be covered by this methodology, other kind of studies was developed such as disassembly studies.

Source
Gate to EHS: Life Cycle Management ? Design for Environment, March 17th, 2003

Link
Gate to EHS




Guidebook for Product Environmental Aspects Assesment ? Development of Certifiable Ecodesign Standard UNE 150301
Guía de Evaluación de Aspectos Ambientales de Producto - Desarrollo de la Norma Certificable de Ecodiseno UNE 150301

Edited by
IHOBE

Content
Guide for supporting environmental product assesment aiming reduction of generated environmental impact. It includes an example proceeding, as well as supporting tool, Ecoindicator 99, that allows quantifying environmental aspects. (Spanish only)

Link
Guidebook




Sector Specific Best Practice Guide - Best Practices in Metal Plating and Finishing

Author
Enterprise Ireland

Comment
In many cases manufacturing in the electrical and electronics sector is closely linked to metal processing operations, e.g. for equipment housings. Therefore this guide is recommended reading to get familiar also with the environmental best practice for metal plating and finishing operations.

Link
Sector Specific Best Practice Guide